Synchroninity and Nostalgia

Synchroninity is a Jungian term, meaning ‘meaningful coinicidences’ when events occur with no apparent causal connection. Where western philospophy believes events to be related in causal sequence,

“synchroninity takes the coinidence of events in space and time as meaning something more than chance”.

Carl Jung wrote that sentence, in his introduction to Wilhelm Baynes classic translation of the I Ching, ( now phonetisced as Yi Jing…. the pronunication of the Chinese word actually sounds like that latter, not the former).

Over at Deb’s World, Deb is wondering how wordpress seems to know her thoughts. Rather than wordpress knowing her thoughts, its maybe the principle of synchroninity at work. When our life is synchronistic, we are in tune with the larger meanderings of the wide universe.A kind of Universal Wide Web. ( UWW) :)….btw, for Aussies out there, Deb and her colleagues are fighting the good fight against the NSW buracracy, who want to take trained teachers, like Deb, out of NSW prisons… go and check out her story here ( that’s right, you click on the word ‘here’) and support her cause…..

This weeks wordpress photo challenge  is Nostalgia. Yesterday, I was out shopping with my daughter. As usual, we head for clothes shops. A girl can never have too many, really. When i saw this teeshirt, I almost laughed out loud.

There was my photo challenge, in wearable black and white.

Actually, I’d been musing about how nostalgic I was for the beach…

the beach in my australian home…

but then again, i’m often nostalgic for times gone by

The Tang dynasty, specifically, at Hangzhou.

But why think of unnessary things, when the universe, synchronistally, presents you with the perfect photo for a WordPress challenge. Right next to the Nostalgia teeshirt, was this one.

But then there was this one

Don’t quit your daydream? Sounds like good advice. Righty-oh. Back to Hangzhou.

For more on Carl Jung and his connection to the I Ching/Yi Jing,

read here for the whole forward:

http://www.iging.com/intro/foreword.htm

or here for an overview

http://www.carl-jung.net/iching.html